Sexy Bison Down & Silk Lace Weight - Cynthia Ann Parker - Special Edition

The story of Cynthia Ann Parker is an historical, bitter, sweet love story. As a child, she was kidnapped at the age of 9 and raised by a Tenowish Comanche couple as their own daughter. Cynthia Ann, who remained with the Indians for almost twenty-five years, forgot white ways, and became thoroughly Comanche. She became Comanche in every sense; was trained in Native ways and was totally devoted to her adopted parents. The memories of her white life quickly faded, and every attempt to ransom her was refused by the tribal council at her request.  She received the name Naduah, or Nautdah ("She carries herself with grace"),

On April 29, 1846, there is record of an encounter by Col. Leonard G. Williams's trading party with Cynthia Ann, who was camped with Comanche on the Canadian River. Despite Williams's ransom offers, tribal elders refused to release her. Later, federal officials P. M. Butler and M. G. Lewis encountered Cynthia Ann with the Yamparika Comanche on the Washita River.  By then she was a full-fledged member of the tribe and married to a Comanche warrior. She never voluntarily returned to white society. Indian agent Robert S. Neighbors learned, probably in 1848, that she was among the Tenawa Comanche and was told by other Comanche that only force would induce her to leave.

She married Peta Nocoma, the young chief who gained fame for his many violent raids on white settlements in the territory. While it was customary for prominent Comanche warriors to take several wives, Peta never took any wife except Cynthia Ann - a mark of extraordinary devotion and honor for her. They had 3 children: Quanah, Pecos and Topsannah (2 boys and 1 girl). Quanah Parker later became a Kwahadi chief.

It is said that in the mid-1840s her brother, John Parker, who had been captured with her, asked her to return to their white family, but she refused, explaining that she loved her husband and children too much to leave them. But against her will, she was returned to her remaining family members, after which she was placed in different family homes and moved several times within the year to follow. After losing her daughter to the flu and believing her husband along with both sons were dead, she refused to speak or eat and eventually died. But one of her sons did live, Quanah, who later added his mother’s sir name to honor her, and became the famous chief Quanah Parker.  Upon his death in 1911, Cynthia Ann’s body was moved and laid to rest with her son, Quanah, in Oklahoma.

This is a bittersweet love story famous in our area of Fort Worth Texas; and over the years we have been taught this story about her tragic abduction.  But when one really reads the story, you will see that she really died of a broken heart here on the prairie.

We want to share with you, her legendary spirit with this beautiful color way that reflects her life on the prairie, with the natural color of the bison and silk blend transitioning into a prairie grass color of greens into a twilight blue evening sky of light blue to a dark blue then a purple sky.  Sleek, shiny, soft, and yes, very very Sexy, this blend of 50% bison down and 50% bombyx silk, is 400+ yards of laceweight goodness, per 50g skein me your next heirloom piece.  Will substitute perfectly into any pattern that uses "Lux" or "Heaven"  

 Please read more about this extraordinary women at 

http://www.lnstar.com/mall/texasinfo/CynthiaAnnParker.htm

http://www.historynet.com/noconas-raid-and-cynthia-ann-parkers-recapture.htm

Sexy Bison Down & Silk Lace Weight - Cynthia Ann Parker - Special Edition

Yarn
$ 54.00
Sexy Bison Down & Silk Lace Weight - Cynthia Ann Parker - Special Edition

Sexy Bison Down & Silk Lace Weight - Cynthia Ann Parker - Special Edition

Yarn
$ 54.00
$ 54.00

The story of Cynthia Ann Parker is an historical, bitter, sweet love story. As a child, she was kidnapped at the age of 9 and raised by a Tenowish Comanche couple as their own daughter. Cynthia Ann, who remained with the Indians for almost twenty-five years, forgot white ways, and became thoroughly Comanche. She became Comanche in every sense; was trained in Native ways and was totally devoted to her adopted parents. The memories of her white life quickly faded, and every attempt to ransom her was refused by the tribal council at her request.  She received the name Naduah, or Nautdah ("She carries herself with grace"),

On April 29, 1846, there is record of an encounter by Col. Leonard G. Williams's trading party with Cynthia Ann, who was camped with Comanche on the Canadian River. Despite Williams's ransom offers, tribal elders refused to release her. Later, federal officials P. M. Butler and M. G. Lewis encountered Cynthia Ann with the Yamparika Comanche on the Washita River.  By then she was a full-fledged member of the tribe and married to a Comanche warrior. She never voluntarily returned to white society. Indian agent Robert S. Neighbors learned, probably in 1848, that she was among the Tenawa Comanche and was told by other Comanche that only force would induce her to leave.

She married Peta Nocoma, the young chief who gained fame for his many violent raids on white settlements in the territory. While it was customary for prominent Comanche warriors to take several wives, Peta never took any wife except Cynthia Ann - a mark of extraordinary devotion and honor for her. They had 3 children: Quanah, Pecos and Topsannah (2 boys and 1 girl). Quanah Parker later became a Kwahadi chief.

It is said that in the mid-1840s her brother, John Parker, who had been captured with her, asked her to return to their white family, but she refused, explaining that she loved her husband and children too much to leave them. But against her will, she was returned to her remaining family members, after which she was placed in different family homes and moved several times within the year to follow. After losing her daughter to the flu and believing her husband along with both sons were dead, she refused to speak or eat and eventually died. But one of her sons did live, Quanah, who later added his mother’s sir name to honor her, and became the famous chief Quanah Parker.  Upon his death in 1911, Cynthia Ann’s body was moved and laid to rest with her son, Quanah, in Oklahoma.

This is a bittersweet love story famous in our area of Fort Worth Texas; and over the years we have been taught this story about her tragic abduction.  But when one really reads the story, you will see that she really died of a broken heart here on the prairie.

We want to share with you, her legendary spirit with this beautiful color way that reflects her life on the prairie, with the natural color of the bison and silk blend transitioning into a prairie grass color of greens into a twilight blue evening sky of light blue to a dark blue then a purple sky.  Sleek, shiny, soft, and yes, very very Sexy, this blend of 50% bison down and 50% bombyx silk, is 400+ yards of laceweight goodness, per 50g skein me your next heirloom piece.  Will substitute perfectly into any pattern that uses "Lux" or "Heaven"  

 Please read more about this extraordinary women at 

http://www.lnstar.com/mall/texasinfo/CynthiaAnnParker.htm

http://www.historynet.com/noconas-raid-and-cynthia-ann-parkers-recapture.htm